Keep HVAC Systems Cool All Summer Long

It’s time to stay cool and leave hot temps behind

It’s official—hot weather is here ahead of schedule. Summer won’t truly start until the Solstice on June 21st, but the high temps we’re currently experiencing don’t appear to be going anywhere anytime soon. According to The Farmers’ Almanac 2022 summer prediction, “…This summer weather will be remembered as a hot one nationwide. Only in New England and around the Great Lakes will the overall average temperatures tilt toward ‘seasonably warm,’ but that’s based on a wave of unseasonably cool air that arrives in September.” These summer conditions are the perfect storm for cooling systems to experience system issues or failures.

The worst thing that can possibly occur to your customer’s building in the summer months is a system or part failure that results in a lack of AC. It is necessary for every aspect of your customer’s HVAC and BAS systems to be in tip-top shape, so this doesn’t happen. (Otherwise, you’ll be stuck with a break/fix job for a cranky and hot customer!)

Common cooling system issues are typical byproducts of:

Out of all those common issues, let’s take a moment to take a deeper dive into chillers. A chiller’s main purpose is to move heat from one location to another so that it can cool/chill it. It is imperative that each mechanism of this system be in good working condition for the process to work as intended. The main components that go into the chilling process are:

If even one of these components malfunctions, the chilling system can be rendered useless or inoperable.

Don’t let your customers ignore warning signs of an overheated system(s). By doing regular maintenance work and having your customer monitor their systems, you’ll be able to catch small problems before they turn into system-ending ones.

Let Kele help you keep your customers cool all summer long. Shop now on kele.com or call today and take advantage of the coolest parts and prices around. Kele’s got you (and your customer) covered!

It’s time to stay cool and leave hot temps behind

It’s official—hot weather is here ahead of schedule. Summer won’t truly start until the Solstice on June 21st, but the high temps we’re currently experiencing don’t appear to be going anywhere anytime soon. According to The Farmers’ Almanac 2022 summer prediction, “…This summer weather will be remembered as a hot one nationwide. Only in New England and around the Great Lakes will the overall average temperatures tilt toward ‘seasonably warm,’ but that’s based on a wave of unseasonably cool air that arrives in September.” These summer conditions are the perfect storm for cooling systems to experience system issues or failures.

The worst thing that can possibly occur to your customer’s building in the summer months is a system or part failure that results in a lack of AC. It is necessary for every aspect of your customer’s HVAC and BAS systems to be in tip-top shape, so this doesn’t happen. (Otherwise, you’ll be stuck with a break/fix job for a cranky and hot customer!)

Common cooling system issues are typical byproducts of:

Out of all those common issues, let’s take a moment to take a deeper dive into chillers. A chiller’s main purpose is to move heat from one location to another so that it can cool/chill it. It is imperative that each mechanism of this system be in good working condition for the process to work as intended. The main components that go into the chilling process are:

If even one of these components malfunctions, the chilling system can be rendered useless or inoperable.

Don’t let your customers ignore warning signs of an overheated system(s). By doing regular maintenance work and having your customer monitor their systems, you’ll be able to catch small problems before they turn into system-ending ones.

Let CCI help you keep your customers cool all summer long. Shop now on kele.com or call today and take advantage of the coolest parts and prices around. CCI’s got you (and your customer) covered!

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